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Doing business as (DBA)

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A trade name (or DBA name, short for doing business as, is a business name that is different than your personal name (if you are a sole proprietor, the names of your partners or the officially registered name of your LLC or corporation.

The legal name of a business is the name of the person or entity that owns a business. If you are the sole owner of your business, its legal name is your full name. If your business is a partnership, the legal name is the name given in your partnership agreement or the last names of the partners. For limited liability corporationss (LLCs) and corporations, the business' legal name is the one that was registered with the state government.

Your business' legal name is required on all government forms and applications, including your application for employer tax IDs, licenses and permits. However, if you want to open a shop or sell your products under a different name, then you may have to file a fictitious name registration form with your government agency.

For example, let's say Mary Smith is a sole proprietor of a catering company she runs out of her house. Mary wants to name her business Seaside Catering instead using her business' legal name, Mary Smith. In order to use Seaside Catering, Mary will need to register that name as a fictitious business name with a government agency. Which government agency, depends on where she lives. In some states, fictitious names are registered with the state government; in others, you register fictitious names with the county clerk's office; and in others, there are no laws requiring businesses to register a fictitious business names.

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External link

Sb cc 50x20.jpg Creative Commons attribution: This entry includes content from the following Business.gov source: Business name registration